April 15, 2004

Senators unanimously approve MUMS bill Legislation would increase number of drugs approved for minor species, minor uses The Minor Use and Minor Species Animal Health Act came a step closer to enactment when the Senate approved the legislation by unanimous consent March 8. The next step is for the House of Representatives to pass the bill. Similar to the program created in 1983 by the Human Orphan Drug Act that increased the availability of drugs for rare human diseases, the MUMS bill would offer pharmaceutical companies incentives to develop drugs to treat uncommon diseases in major animal species and diseases in minor species. Minor species encompass thousands of animal species, including fish and sheep. Minor uses are drug treatments for ...

AVMA News

Deadline for advance convention registration savings approaches The advance registration deadline for the 141st AVMA Annual Convention is approaching quickly. Association members who register before the April 22 deadline can save $100 off the full, on-site registration fee. With a growing continuing education program that now exceeds 900 hours, the convention, which will be held July 24-28 in Philadelphia, promises to be one of the Association's best. Access to the history, dining, and shopping of one of America's oldest cities is driving strong early registration for attendees and exhibitors alike. Hope is high that the Philadelphia meeting will set an attendance record for the third straight year. Registration forms and convention informa ...

FDA Surveillance News

NOTE: As of November 2007, the AVMA discontinued use of the term "informed consent" in matters relating to veterinary medicine replacing it with the term "owner consent". (see JAVMA News, Dec. 15 ) Minimizing the risk factors associated with veterinary NSAIDs FDA-CVM offers suggestions based on postmarketing experience Veterinary practitioners must weigh the serious risks associated with nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug usage. Specific strategies can be implemented to reduce the likelihood of harming patients. Moreover, practitioners can educate their clients by communicating the serious risks that accompany the benefits of those medications. Vital to the mission of the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veter ...

International News

Trade losses from animal diseases projected to be in billions With approximately a third of the world's meat export market currently affected by animal disease outbreaks, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations is projecting losses of up to $10 billion if bans on meat and live animal imports are extended through 2004. Twelve countries will suffer economically this year as a result of export bans or market constraints brought on by avian influenza and bovine spongiform encephalopathy, the FAO stated in a March 2 release. The multibillion-dollar losses do not take into account the costs of public disease control measures, losses to producers and consumers, or the general costs to the poultry or cattle industries. Headquart ...

Ruminants

New form of BSE sparks discussion Italian researchers say they have identified a new form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy that they have coined bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy or BASE. The study, reported in the March 2 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, has sparked discussion in veterinary and medical communities. Between January 2001 and August 2003, a BSE surveillance program in Italy identified 103 cases from 1,638,275 tested brain samples. When scientists tested for the abnormal prion that causes BSE, they found two samples that contained an unfamiliar prion. The new prion causes accumulations of amyloid brain plaques, similar to plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease, instead of creating holes ...

Small Animal

A puppy paternity test AKC turns to DNA testing to ensure registry accuracy On television, DNA testing is high drama—leading detectives to the identities of killers and other criminals, and helping to sort out heart-wrenching disputes over the paternity of a child. In real life, DNA testing has found many less dramatic, but important roles, including helping to confirm the parentage of purebred dogs. Though determining the paternity of a puppy is unlikely to make great primetime television, it can mean a lot to the health of a breed over a couple of generations—particularly, if the puppy goes on to sire many litters of his own. That's why the American Kennel Club has turned to DNA testing to ensure the accuracy of its purebred dog ...

Take Notice

FDA warns compounders, veterinarians The Food and Drug Administration has issued at least five warning letters to pharmacies compounding human and/or animal drugs since issuing a Compliance Policy Guide clarifying the department's stance on drug compounding. The FDA has also warned two veterinary practices about extralabel drug use and illegal drug residues in food animals. The compounding warning letters allege that the pharmacies have failed to comply with the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, which limits drug compounding to situations in which a product is medically necessary for treatment and is prescribed as part of a valid veterinarian-client-patient relationship for a specific patient. The CPG, available at www.fda.gov , and an article ...

Washington Veterinary News

AVMAPAC a factor in recent legislative victories Opportunities for AVMA members to get involved In recent months, the AVMA has experienced great success in the passage and enactment of several key bills on the Executive Board's legislative agenda. This success can be attributed to the lobbying efforts of AVMA leadership and staff, campaign support for congressional candidates, and advocacy from the AVMA grassroots network. One of the easiest ways for AVMA members to take action and help continue this success is to deliver an AVMA Political Action Committee check personally to a candidate in their home state/district, and talk to them about the AVMA's legislative agenda. The AVMAPAC mission is to advance the AVMA legislative agenda by provid ...

Wildlife

Veterinary drug kills vultures abroad Veterinarians warned to take heed A veterinary drug, diclofenac, is killing vultures in Pakistan and other parts of the Indian subcontinent where it is used widely in livestock as an anti-inflammatory drug, according to a recent study in Nature. Three species of vultures are in danger of becoming extinct, and their demise could have public health consequences. The drug may become available in the United States, and wildlife veterinarians want practitioners to take heed of the situation abroad. "By all accounts, diclofenac is a great veterinary drug for livestock," said Dr. J. Lindsay Oaks, an assistant professor in the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology at Washington State Uni ...