Specialty board recognizes equine imaging, not botanical medicine

Published on April 24, 2019

The AVMA American Board of Veterinary Specialties has granted provisional recognition of equine diagnostic imaging as a specialty within the American College of Veterinary Radiology. On the other hand, the ABVS declined granting recognition to the American College of Veterinary Botanical Medicine; however, ACVBM representatives are exploring the possibility of creating a specialty within the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology.

Dr. Barrett examining a horse
Dr. Myra Barrett, an associate professor of veterinary diagnostic imaging at Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, performs a tendon ultrasound examination on a horse. (Courtesy of Dr. Barrett)

While meeting in late February, the ABVS also granted full recognition of parasitology as a specialty within the American College of Veterinary Microbiologists. During an April conference call, the ABVS granted full recognition of reptile and amphibian practice as a specialty under the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners.

The organizing committee for the specialty in equine diagnostic imaging submitted a letter of intent to the ABVS in 2015 and a formal petition for recognition of the specialty in 2017.

"Digital radiography and ultrasound are the traditional imaging modalities of the equine practitioner," said Dr. Wm. Tod Drost, executive director of the American College of Veterinary Radiology. "With the increased availability of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and the growth of teleradiology, the time is right to develop a group of radiologists whose sole focus is on the horse."

Dr. Drost said the ACVR is excited to add equine diagnostic imaging as an AVMA-recognized veterinary specialty. He added that residency programs are starting soon for the new specialty.

There are currently 22 AVMA-recognized veterinary specialty organizations and 33 AVMA-recognized veterinary specialties, with the ACVR also certifying diplomates in radiology and radiation oncology.

The organizing committee of the proposed American College of Veterinary Botanical Medicine submitted a letter of intent to the ABVS in 2014 and a formal petition for recognition in 2016.

"ACVBM was advised that there is concern that there are too many overlapping areas with clinical pharmacology," said Dr. Nancy Scanlan, an ACVBM representative.

Representatives of the ACVBM and the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology have been exploring the possibility of veterinary botanical medicine becoming recognized as a specialty under the ACVCP. Dr. Scanlan said the ACVBM and ACVCP are taking the time needed to identify shared or parallel knowledge.

Related JAVMA content:

Comments sought on proposed specialty in equine diagnostic imaging (Aug. 15, 2018)

Comments invited on proposed veterinary botanical medicine specialty (April 15, 2017)