November 15, 2001

 

 Two countries plant two trees in honor of Sept. 11 attack - November 15, 2001

Posted November 1, 2001
 

 

Two countries plant two trees in honor of Sept. 11 attack

Two kauri trees were planted Oct. 3 at the Massey University Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, New Zealand, in honor of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Participants included Dr. Jenks S. Britt, past chair of the AVMA Council on Education; Massey University institute head, Dr. Grant Guilford; and Dr. Douglas G. Aspros, current Council on Education member.

In a ceremony acknowledging respect for the environment, the earth, and all its creatures, visiting members of the AVMA Council on Education witnessed a special tree planting and blessing Oct. 3 at the Massey University Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, New Zealand.

Two kauri trees were planted side by side as a memorial of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, as a union of the United States and New Zealand, and as recognition of council's diligence in traveling and working in an unsettled world.

"The twin kauri represent not only the fallen buildings of the World Trade Center, but the togetherness of two countries, two peoples, two cultures, and two organizations," said institute head (dean), Dr. Grant Guilford.

"They are planted close because that is what we should be. They are to be planted to make us remember that it is always about two, not dominance by one."

In the native language of his tribe, Nick Roskruge, Massey faculty member and Maori tribesman, performed an introductory welcome and blessing, lamenting the passing of innocent people in America.

Dr. Donald G. Simmons, director of the AVMA Education and Research Division, was present at the ceremony.

"I felt honored to be a part of a ceremony that recognized national suffering while emphasizing global rededication to common principles," Dr. Simmons said.

The ceremony was in conjunction with the council's site visit to New Zealand to determine whether Massey Institute's veterinary education program will receive international approval status, to be decided in March of 2002.