February 01, 2014

 

 Cornell to open equine hospital near racetrack

Posted Jan. 15, 2014


Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine plans in April to open Cornell Ruffian Equine Specialists, a referral and emergency care hospital that will be near the Belmont Park racetrack backstretch on Long Island in Elmont, N.Y.
 
The college has signed a lease-buy agreement with Racebrook Capital Advisors LLC for the former Ruffian Equine Medical Center, according to a Dec. 4, 2013, university press release. The new hospital will provide elective equine specialty services to horses referred by their attending veterinarians. Full emergency and critical care services will be offered by spring 2015.
 


Cornell Ruffian Equine Specialists, a referral and emergency care hospital, will offer advanced orthopedic and soft tissue surgeries, among other services, starting in April. The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine took ownership of the former Ruffian Equine Medical Center. (Courtesy of Cornell University CVM)
 
The 22,000-square-foot facility will provide surgical, imaging, diagnostic, and rehabilitation services. Dr. Alan J. Nixon, equine orthopedic surgeon and director of the Comparative Orthopedics Laboratory at Cornell, will serve as the chief medical officer. Drs. Lisa A. Fortier and Norm G. Ducharme, both professors of large animal surgery at the veterinary college and pioneers in regenerative and laryngeal procedures, will also offer advanced surgical procedures.
 
The hospital will be staffed by Cornell veterinarians and veterinary technicians and will offer a full complement of advanced orthopedic and soft tissue surgery and regenerative therapies, an internal medicine service, and diagnostic modalities, including advanced imaging such as MRI, CT, nuclear scintigraphy, high-speed treadmill endoscopy, arthroscopy, and laboratory services.
 
The Ruffian Equine Medical Center was opened in 2009 by International Equine Acquisitions Holdings Inc., which owned 2008 Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner Big Brown but closed less than two years after opening, when IEAH failed to meet its financial requirements.