January 01, 2014

 

 Grants awarded for testing methods for food contaminants

Posted Dec. 18, 2013

The Food and Drug Administration awarded grants in September to seven members of the Veterinary Laboratory Investigation and Response Network to expand and validate testing methods for food contaminants.
 
The grant recipients are as follows: 
  • University of California-Davis, $99,000 annually for five years, for validation of methods to detect multiple toxicants in complex matrices including carbamate insecticides in feed and rumen contents, ricinine in liver, and penitrem A and roquefortine in stomach contents.
  • Iowa State University, $99,000 annually for five years, for validation of methods to detect multiple chemical toxins in complex matrices: mycotoxins, antimicrobials, elements, and vitamins in blood, urine, and milk.
  • University of Kentucky Research Foundation, $98,996 annually for five years, for validation of liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry methods to detect a variety of anticoagulant rodenticide compounds and mycotoxins in animal tissues, biologic fluids, and feeds.
  • University of Pennsylvania, $99,000 annually for five years, for validation of methods to detect mycotoxins in complex animal feeds and animal tissues and biological fluids, by use of a hand-held reader.
  • South Dakota State University, $99,000 annually for five years, to conduct a multilaboratory validation of Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Real-Time PCR System for detecting Salmonella organisms in raw pet food and mice droppings.
  • Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, $90,351 annually for two years, to standardize and validate methods to detect Campylobacter species in feces of pet dogs and cats.
  • Washington State University, $99,000 annually for five years, to identify, optimize, and validate analytic methods for determination of trace element and heavy metal contaminants in animal feeds, tissues, and veterinary diagnostic samples.