December 01, 2006

 
​WASHINGTON VETERINARY NEWS

 AVMA fellows placed with Congress, Homeland Security Department - December 1, 2006

 
 
posted November 15, 2006
 

The 2006-2007 AVMA fellows have received their placements. The Congressional Science Fellows, Drs. Heather Case and Lloyd Keck, are working in the offices of congressmen Robert Andrews of New Jersey and Vic Snyder of Arizona, respectively. Dr. Sarah Babcock, the Executive Branch Fellow, is serving in the Department of Homeland Security's Biological Countermeasures Portfolio.

AVMA fellows get an insider's understanding of the governmental process. During their yearlong fellowship, they gain insight into the future of science and the veterinary profession and serve on the front line of government decision making.

Dr. Case, a 1998 University of Minnesota graduate, is working in Rep. Andrews' office on issues pertaining to agriculture, energy, the environment, and homeland security. "These issue areas complement my broad interests in public health, animal health, and disaster response and preparedness," she said.

With Rep. Snyder, Dr. Keck's responsibilities include agriculture, export, and food safety matters. "I sought placement in Congressman Snyder's office because he is a physician, and the one-medicine concept promoted by AVMA President Roger Mahr will receive firsthand discussion," said Dr. Keck, a 1982 graduate of Louisiana State University.

Dr. Babcock, the second AVMA Executive Branch Fellow, is focusing on emerging and foreign animal disease threats at the Department of Homeland Security Directorate for Science and Technology. She has also had the opportunity to participate in interagency collaboration on various issues, including disaster preparedness.

"These experiences require me to think critically and creatively in order to map out strategies to solve problems," said Dr. Babcock, a 2004 Michigan State University graduate. "Developing technically sound approaches is crucial to monitoring and controlling emerging infectious diseases and increase food security.